Around Waughop Lake, with birds and flowers

It’s 60 degrees outside!  And the sun is shining!

Naturally, I went for a walk.

Waughop Lake is part of Fort Steilacoom Park in Lakewood, Washington.  It used to be a farm for the mental hospital across the road, where the patients doing farm work was considered therapy back in the old days.  Nowadays it’s a city park, with soccer fields and a bark park (as my sister calls off-leash areas) and trails.  And an old cemetery managed by a wonderful group called Grave Concerns.

Waughop Lake is not a Native American name, even though it sounds like it ought to be, at least to me.  It’s named after a former superintendent of the mental hospital.

Anyway, it was a lovely spring day, and my new camera lets me take much better photos than my old one.  So here’s some of what I saw.

A view across Waughop Lake from the miniature boat area (they have races there in the summertime).
A view across Waughop Lake from the miniature boat launching area (they have races there in the summertime).
Ducks. Mallards, although the angle of the sun makes it harder to see their coloration.
Ducks. Mallards, although the angle of the sun makes it harder to see their coloration.
Canada geese are ubiquitous around here.
Canada geese are ubiquitous around here.
You may remember a recent photo I posted of some Glory of the Snow in my garden. These (and lots more) were growing in the grass near the lake. Back in the day, the wife of one of the former superintendents landscaped the area around the lake. It's mostly gone back wild, but some of the non-natives still grow and thrive there.
You may remember a recent photo I posted of some Glory of the Snow in my garden. These (and lots more) were growing in the grass near the lake. Back in the day, the wife of one of the former superintendents landscaped the area around the lake. It’s mostly gone back wild, but some of the non-natives still grow and thrive there.
I'm not positive what this is. I've heard them called coots. They're all over the place around water in this part of the world. Salt and fresh.
I’m not positive what this is. I’ve heard them called coots. They’re all over the place around water in this part of the world. Salt and fresh.  ETA:  According to my birder friend Katrina, this is an American Coot.
Forsythia, a non-native, but gloriously sunshine yellow.
Forsythia, a non-native, but gloriously sunshine yellow.
I'm not sure what kind of bird this is, but there's no way I'd ever have been able to take a photo like this with my old camera.
I’m not sure what kind of bird this is, but there’s no way I’d ever have been able to take a photo like this with my old camera.  ETA:  Same source, Downy Woodpecker.
Plum blossom. Everybody and his cousin has a pink or a white ornamental plum in his or her yard here.
Plum blossom. Everybody and his cousin has a pink or a white ornamental plum in his or her yard here.
Not sure what this little guy is, either. The only reason I noticed him was because the closer I got to him the louder his chirps got.
Not sure what this little guy is, either. The only reason I noticed him was because the closer I got to him the louder his chirps got.  ETA:  And this little dude is a Song Sparrow.
The pussy willows are just about done already. But they're so pretty.
The pussy willows are just about done already. But they’re so pretty.
A view back towards where I took the first photo, from the opposite side of the lake.
A view back towards where I took the first photo, from the opposite side of the lake.

And that was my walk at Waughop Lake.