All posts by mmjustus

Repeating History listed at The Fussy Librarian — and on sale for a week

Repeating History, the first Time in Yellowstone novel, is being featured Monday, December 16th at The Fussy Librarian, a new website that offers personalized ebook recommendations, in the historical fiction category.  You can read the first chapter here for free.

In honor of that listing, I have dropped the price of Repeating History‘s e-version from $5.99 to $2.99 for the week starting tomorrow Saturday the 14th, to run till the 21st, at Amazon and Smashwords.

I’m really excited about being part of this service.  I hope you’ll find many interesting books there.  I’ve already found a few myself.

Repeating History 400 cover

Cross-Country: Adventures Alone Across America and Back

400T E cover

I am proud to announce the publication of my new book, a non-fiction travel narrative entitled  Cross-Country:  Adventures Alone Across America and Back:

After a childhood of summers spent in the back seat of a car, and four months before the turn of the millenium, M.M. Justus decided to follow in the footsteps of her heroes John Steinbeck and William Least-Heat Moon, not to mention Bill Bryson, and drive alone across America’s backroads for three months.  Like the bear going over the mountain, she wanted to see what she could see.

The places she visited ranged from the homely to the exotic, from the Little Town on the Prairie to Scotty’s Castle, from New York’s Twin Towers to an ‘alien’ landing site in Wyoming.  From snow in Vermont to the tropical heat of New Orleans. 

After over 14,000 miles, history both public and personal, and one life-changing event, she finally arrived back where she’d started from, only to discover it wasn’t the same place she’d left behind at all.
It is available in print through Amazon and CreateSpace, and through other retailers coming soon, and as digital editions through Amazon and Smashwords, with other retailers coming soon:

You can read the first chapter for free here:  http://mmjustus.com/fictionCrossCountry.html

Thank you for your time.

M.M. Justus

I’m living in a Pemco commercial!

I was in my sewing room this afternoon, looked out my window, and this is what I saw in the septic field behind my condo:

goats 1
Goats!

 

And more goats!
And more goats!

 

Hey, lady, I didn't give you permission to take my picture.
Hey, lady, I didn’t give you permission to take my picture.

 

The septic field’s been something of a jungle for quite some time, and I guess the condo board finally decided to do something about it [g].  They’re sure a lot quieter and more environmentally friendly than a bush hog.  Not to mention cuter.

And if you’re wondering about the subject heading…

more earthquakes in Yellowstone

This article from my local news station, located in Seattle, talks about recent swarms of earthquakes in Yellowstone.  Earthquake swarms aren’t all that unusual there, but what fascinated me was the last three paragraphs:

“Smith traced the three recent earthquake swarms to the Hebgen Lake quake [in 1959 — my time traveling hero’s earthquake].

‘These are a really related,’ he said.

‘We think that much of the seismicity is still aftershocks from that event in 1959. It can go on for hundreds of years.'”

 

digital photos of paper books

Sorry, I can’t help myself.  The proofs of the last three Time in Yellowstone books arrived today, and they’re beautiful.  I need to tweak a couple of things (two of the covers have spines that are slightly off), then they’ll be approved for sale!

Anyway, without further ado…

True Gold's front
True Gold’s front
True Gold's back
True Gold’s back
Homesick's front
Homesick’s front
Homesick's back
Homesick’s back
Finding Home's front
Finding Home’s front
Finding Home's back
Finding Home’s back
And all four books lined up on the shelf!
And all four books lined up on the shelf!

 

I am so pleased I could pop.

Wow, what a view

Wednesday my friend L and I did something we’d been wanting to do for a long time.  We went up to Crystal Mountain Ski Area, and we rode the gondola, which is open to sightseers in the off-season.  It cost twenty bucks, but it was worth every penny.  I really had no idea how far we’d be able to see from up there.  I’d been to Crystal to ski several times, but that was fifteen years ago, and even then I’d never gotten that high on the mountain (the easiest trail down from the top of the gondola is intermediate, and I never got much beyond high beginner trails the entire decade or so that I skied regularly).

Anyway, the day was about as clear and dry as it gets in the Pacific Northwest (and hot — 90+F in the lowlands, which broke records for this time of year, and in the upper 70sF even at almost 7000 feet at the top of the gondola), and the views ranged from Mt. Adams, clear down by the Columbia River, all the way to Mt. Baker, all the way up by the Canadian border.  And Mt. Rainier looked as if a person could reach out and touch it.

The only view even slightly obscured was down towards Puget Sound, where haze hovered over the water, blocking our view of the Olympics and of the cities down there (I bet the nighttime view in clear weather of those cities must be absolutely amazing).

There’s a fancy restaurant up at the top of the gondola, but it was beyond our price range, so we’d packed a picnic (actually, we’d bought our picnic at a Subway on the way), and we had plenty of chipmunk company while we ate.

All in all, it was a seriously spectacular trip.  If you happen to be in this part of the world on a clear day, don’t miss it.

Mount Rainier from the top of the Crystal Mountain gondola.  That's the White River down below.
Mount Rainier from the top of the Crystal Mountain gondola. That’s the White River down below.
That shadowy curve above the crags is Mt. St. Helens.
That shadowy curve above the crags is Mt. St. Helens.
Mt. Adams, and the tubs of flowers on the path to the restaurant.
Mt. Adams, and the tubs of flowers on the path to the restaurant.
Welcome to Crystal Mountain, elevation 6872 feet.
Welcome to Crystal Mountain, elevation 6872 feet.
That little white triangle on the horizon towards the righthand edge of the photo is Mt. Baker.
That little white triangle on the horizon almost dead center is Mt. Baker.
Lunch company.
Lunch company.
Really brave lunch company.
Really brave lunch company.
Headed back down the gondola.  Taken through the clear cover, so please excuse the reflections.
Headed back down the gondola. Taken through the clear cover, so please excuse the reflections.

Just a reminder, the Time in Yellowstone series: Repeating History, True Gold, and Finding Home, and the story “Homesick” (including chapters from all three novels, and only 99 cents for the e-version), are now available as ebooks on Amazon and Smashwords, and Repeating History is now available as a paper book from Amazon and CreateSpace, with the other books coming in paper editions very soon.

Finding Home and Homesick now available on Amazon and Smashwords

The E-versions of Finding Home and “Homesick” are now live on Amazon as well as Smashwords:

Finding Home, volume 3 of my Time in Yellowstone series :

Amazon

Smashwords

small Finding Home cover

“Homesick”, a short story in the same series, including sample chapters of all three novels, for 99 cents:

Amazon

Smashwords

small Homesick cover

For those who’ve been asking.

Paper editions of all four books to come, hopefully in a week or two.

book news

First, the proof copy of Repeating History arrived in the mail today.  To say I am pleased and amazed falls rather short of the mark.  Not to sound like a cliché, but you know what they say about lifelong dreams?  Yes, that.

Anyway, here’s photos of the absolutely beautiful cover, if I do say so myself:

 

The front, obviously.
The front, obviously.
And the back.
And the back.

The photo is one I took.  The background texture is actually from the same photo.  And the design is all mine.  I couldn’t be more pleased.

I need to make a few small corrections, then I will be hitting the publish button and uploading the other three books in the Time in Yellowstone series to CreateSpace over the next week.  As soon as they’re available I’ll be posting links here.

Also, the third novel and a short story in my Time in Yellowstone series are now available at Smashwords.

Finding Home

“Homesick” , which includes chapters from all three novels, and is only 99 cents.

Both books are also being published on Amazon for the Kindle, and should be available in a day or so.  I will post those links here as soon as I have them.

salt water and gardens

Point Defiance Park is one of the most beautiful places in Tacoma, Washington, and that’s saying a lot.  It’s a huge city park (708 acres) on a point sticking out into Puget Sound, with a zoo, a waterfront promenade and beach, a replica of a historic fort, extensive gardens, and expanses of old-growth forest laced with hiking trails.

I had a meeting in Tacoma yesterday afternoon, and afterwards I decided to go walk the promenade, enjoy the gardens, and take some photos.  Here’s a selection:

An iconic western Washington view -- the Pt. Defiance-Vashon Island ferry making its run.
An iconic western Washington view — the Pt. Defiance-Vashon Island ferry making its run across Puget Sound.
Shaded in the foreground to the right is the waterfront promenade walk at Pt. Defiance.  In the background is Mt. Rainier.
Shaded in the foreground to the right is the waterfront promenade walk at Pt. Defiance. In the background is Mt. Rainier.
It's the time of year for dahlias, and the dahlia test garden at Pt. Defiance is in full bloom.  This is my favorite kind of dahlia, known as a ball dahlia.
It’s the time of year for dahlias, and the dahlia test garden at Pt. Defiance is in full bloom. This is my favorite kind of dahlia, known as a ball dahlia.
This dahlia looks like a peppermint stick.
This dahlia looks like a peppermint stick.
These white dahlias were bigger than my outspread hand.  Some of the dahlias on display were bigger than my head.
These white dahlias were bigger than my outspread hand. Some of the dahlias on display were bigger than my head.
One of a dozen rows of dahlias in the test garden.
One of a dozen rows of dahlias in the test garden.
This pretty walkway lined with yellow rudbeckias and green hostas, among others, is near the dahlia garden.
This pretty walkway lined with yellow rudbeckias, white Japanese anemones and hostas in lots of shades of green, is near the dahlia garden.
Pt. Defiance also has a huge rose garden, which is still going strong now in late August.  I don't know what kind these are, but they're profuse.
Pt. Defiance also has a huge rose garden, which is still going strong now in late August. I don’t know what kind these are, but they’re profuse.
This is my favorite color of rose, kind of an orangey salmon.
This is my favorite color of rose, kind of an orangey salmon.
And here's a view of part of the rose garden with its gazebo, which is popular for summer weddings, and for good reason.
And here’s a view of part of the rose garden with its gazebo, which is popular for summer weddings, and for good reason.