July 11: One more day in the Historic Triangle

Which is what they call Williamsburg/Jamestown/Yorktown, and the land in between. It’s not as weird as what they call the area around the mouth of Chesapeake Bay, which is Hampton Roads (the local TV stations use the term the way we say Puget Sound area at home).

Anyway, I did not realize I’d want to spend what amounts to over four days here, but there’s just so much to see.

This morning I went back to Colonial Williamsburg, because I had to go walk around it one last time. You don’t have to buy a ticket to walk the streets or go into the gardens or shops, so I didn’t. I went into the dressmaker’s shop and bought a pack of fat quarters of reproduction fabrics, then I wandered around looking at gardens again. So beautiful. Seriously.

After lunch, I went back to Jamestown, and went through the living history museum across the road from where I was yesterday. The living history part consisted of a mockup of a Powhatan Indian village, a reconstructed Jamestown Fort, and those ships I saw from the ferry the other day. It was all interesting, especially the ships, but the real treasure was indoors – a terrific museum detailing the history of Jamestown from before the landing to when the capitol was moved to Williamsburg about a hundred years later. That was where I spent most of my time (it didn’t hurt that it was indoors in the AC on another scorching, humid day [wry g]).

They didn’t let us take photos in the museum, but here’s some Colonial Williamsburg garden photos (just because I can’t resist), and some photos of the living history part of Jamestown Settlement.

Tomorrow is more living history and an auto tour at Yorktown Battlefield, then on to the Eastern Shore.

Bells of Ireland, which also happens to be the first flower I ever grew from seed when I was a kid.
Bells of Ireland, which also happens to be the first flower I ever grew from seed when I was a kid.
Trellises the old-fashioned way.
Trellises the old-fashioned way.
The herb garden behind the apothecary shop.
The herb garden behind the apothecary shop.
Another view of the apothecary herb garden.
Another view of the apothecary herb garden.
Musicians along Duke of Gloucester St.
Musicians along Duke of Gloucester St.
The 114 foot long Susan Constant (a reproduction, obviously), the largest of the three ships that brought the first settlers to Jamestown.
The 114 foot long Susan Constant (a reproduction, obviously), the largest of the three ships that brought the first settlers to Jamestown.
Inside the Susan Constant.
Inside the Susan Constant.
54 people lived in this space for over four months while traveling to Virginia in 1607.
54 people lived in this space for over four months while traveling to Virginia in 1607.
A sailor telling the story of the Susan Constant.
A sailor telling the story of the Susan Constant.
One of the buildings inside Jamestown Fort.
One of the buildings inside Jamestown Fort.
I bet that was miserable to wear in a Virginia summer.
I bet that was miserable to wear in a Virginia summer.
The interior of the first church at Jamestown.  All of these buildings are reproductions built in the 1950s to commemorate the 350th anniversary of the landing.
The interior of the first church at Jamestown. All of these buildings are reproductions built in the 1950s to commemorate the 350th anniversary of the landing.