July 28: Wandering around Danbury, and state parks that shouldn’t have historic names

Last night, Irene and I walked around her neighborhood, which has houses built over 200 years ago. That was fun, if a bit hot and sweaty, and dark by the time we got back. We also ate Thai food for supper, which was another first for me. I’d always thought Thai food had to be really hot and spicy, so I’d always avoided it. Turns out I was wrong. I had pad thai with shrimp and lots of bean sprouts, and it was quite delicious.

This morning I was looking at my map and noticed a state park named after Franklin Delano Roosevelt that was only about thirty miles away, so I decided to go check it out. Irene tells me that it’s only a ten minute walk to the train station and a two-hour ride to go into New York City, but NYC intimidates the heck out of me. Someday I’ll fly into JFK and actually stay in the city somewhere, but for now, no. By the time I got there I’d only have four hours or so to do stuff before I’d have to turn around and come back.

Anyway, so it turns out because the roads are so twisty and turny and go through so many little 30 mph towns, thirty miles took about an hour. And when I got there, it turned out that it wasn’t a historic park at all. In which case why name it after him? Oh, well.

I came back and went to the Danbury Railway Museum, after getting a recommendation for the diner across the street where I ate a huge Italian grinder for lunch. Grinder appears to be the local term for a sub sandwich. Anyway, it was good.

And the museum was fun. It had four working model railroad setups, and lots of railway artifacts, and, outside, at least twenty vintage rail cars, engines, and cabooses, some of which you could go inside of. I went in a couple of them, but my nemesis the weather drove me back inside, which was fine.

The Danbury Railway Museum.
The Danbury Railway Museum.
A whole rack of antique railway brochures.  The one fourth from the right in the fourth from the top row is for the Spokane, Portland, and Seattle Railroad [g].
A whole rack of antique railway brochures. The one fourth from the right in the fourth from the top row is for the Spokane, Portland, and Seattle Railroad [g].
One of the four model railway layouts, each with a button to push to make it run.
One of the four model railway layouts, each with a button to push to make it run.
Some of the many antique railway cars in the museum's yard.
Some of the many antique railway cars in the museum’s yard.
I'm not quite sure what the purpose of these pink pigs is, but I thought they were cute.
I’m not quite sure what the purpose of these pink pigs is, but I thought they were cute.
A slightly more than 100 year old steam engine.
A slightly more than 100 year old steam engine.

I came back to Irene’s and now I’m catching up on things and figuring out where I’m heading tomorrow and where I’m going to spend the night. It’s supposed to be cooler in general tomorrow, and cooler on the coast than here, so I’m going to see about camping for the first time since I fell out of the van. We’ll see how that goes.

Heading east by north. It’s funny how the coastline runs east-west in this part of the world.