Tag Archives: Duluth MN

September 12: Frost? Really? Already?

According to the weather forecaster on a local Fargo, North Dakota, newscast (I’m almost 70 miles southeast of there tonight), the average first frost date is September 18th. And the forecast is for frost over the next couple of nights, with a high in the fifties F tomorrow. My word.  According to the Geyser Gazers FB group, it’s snowing in Yellowstone.  I’m starting to feel the need to get back over the Rockies soon, for some strange reason…

Oh, and I didn’t get a photo of it, but my habit of reading road signs the way I used to read cereal boxes and mayonnaise jars as a kid (when I ran out of any other reading material) paid off today. An adopt-a-highway sign was claimed by Wreck-A-Mended, a car collision repair company [g].

I got a late start this morning, and after a couple of errands that included picking up maps at AAA for my revised route, finally left Duluth a bit berfore eleven. It was interesting watching the thick forest gradually change to prairie with the only trees at low spots and along waterways, the farther west I went across Minnesota.

Other than that, and hitting a patch of mizzle (to use a Pacific Northwest term for a combination of mist and drizzle) this afternoon, that was pretty much the day. Well, and passing lake after lake after lake. This is Minnesota, the land of ten thousand lakes, after all. Although the AAA book says it’s more like fifteen thousand, and I have no problem believing that.

It was gray gloomy all day, which was fine (I didn’t have to fight my sunglasses [wry g]), and I stopped for the night here in the small town of Perham, Minnesota. A small town with an enormous quilt shop, actually, so that was fun. I suspect they do at least 75% of their business online, because Perham itself is only about 2500 people, and even if they attract a regional customer base, it’s still pretty huge for a place like this. I was good and bought only one fabric panel, a two-thirds yard-sized photo-like image of a double row of fall-foliaged trees.

Speaking of fall foliage, I saw a lot of birches just beginning to turn yellow today.

As of yesterday, Merlin has 14,000 miles on him, and I’ve been on the road for three and a half months. I suspect I’ll be home about the time I hit four months.

And the cold is improving. Or rather, I am. I’ve even got most of my voice back!

If this is a water tower, which I suspect it is, I need to add it to my collection of odd water tower photos. Too bad I can't remember which small town it belongs to.
If this is a water tower, which I suspect it is, I need to add it to my collection of odd water tower photos from this trip. Too bad I can’t remember which small town it belongs to.  ETA:  I’m told it’s in Brainerd, and that it is indeed a water tower.  Thanks, pmrabble (from LJ).
The last time I saw the Mississippi River, I was in St. Louis, Missouri, over two months ago.
The last time I saw the Mississippi River, I was in St. Louis, Missouri, over two months ago.
The river itself.
The river itself.
Heading out onto the prairie. I'll be on the Great Plains until I hit the Rockies in western Montana.
Heading out onto the prairie. I’ll be on the Great Plains until I hit the Rockies in western Montana.
Yet another Cool Sky Photo [tm].
Yet another Cool Sky Photo [tm].

September 8-11: Catching up

It does occur to me that I should bring this up to speed, being sick aside [wry g].

I woke up on Manitoulin Island the morning of the 8th to a misty, moisty morning. It rained on me off and on as I drove north to the swinging bridge, which is the only other way, aside from the ferry, off the island. It’s called the swinging bridge because that’s what it does to let boat traffic through. Not a drawbridge, but a swinging bridge, which supposedly is closed for fifteen minutes every hour on the hour for this very purpose, but I got there right on the hour, and it wasn’t closed. Then again, there weren’t any boats in the passage, either, and it would have been silly of them to open it if no one was waiting.

Rocks and trees and trees and rocks [g]. At least three different people described the scenery in western Ontario to me using this phrase, and I have to admit they’re right. It’s still pretty, though, and I stopped to enjoy a little cascade called the Serpent River Falls, and to note the glacial marks on the rocks nearby.

The cascade of Serpent River Falls north of the Lake Huron shore.
The cascade of Serpent River Falls north of the Lake Huron shore.
There's a term for this sort of glacial etching, but I forget what it is.
There’s a term for this sort of glacial etching, but I forget what it is.  ETA:  Thnidu from LJ suggested striations, and that’s exactly the word I was looking for.  Thanks!

I was getting tired much sooner than normal by the time I reached Sault Ste. Marie, so I found a motel and holed up for the rest of the afternoon. The following morning was worse, so I paid for a second night, and the only time I got out that day was to go get food and hit a drug store for some meds and vitamin C and more tissue.

The next morning, September 10th, I was feeling enough better (and stir crazy) that I wanted to go ahead, so I crossed the border back into the States, where the only thing the pleasant customs officer asked me was if I’d bought anything to bring home over the past month. I told him about the cross-stitch patterns and the quilt fabric and the kitchen magnets and the three prints, and he smiled and waved me on through. Which was a good thing because getting the receipts out would have slowed things down considerably, since they were stowed away in one of the bins under my bed in the back.

It’s actually sort of a relief to be back in the land of miles and Fahrenheit again, if only because now I don’t have to peer down at my speedometer (I can’t read the kilometer part without taking my sunglasses off, which has been really annoying), and, more importantly, do all these calculations in my head all the time (exchange rate, too — I can’t seem to help myself [wry g]). I love Canada, but it is just enough of an uncanny valley for me that I don’t feel quite “right” there – I’m not explaining it well, but anyway. Like I said, I probably should have done it as the first part of the trip, when I wasn’t so worn out.

Crossing over into the U.S. on a very large bridge.
Crossing over into the U.S. on a very large bridge.
Doesn't this look like mountains behind clouds? Or maybe I'm just homesick for mountains, I don't know.
Doesn’t this look like mountains behind clouds? Or maybe I’m just homesick for mountains, I don’t know.
"The legend lives on from the Chippewa on down Of the big lake they called 'gitche gumee'" Lake Superior from just east of Marquette, Michigan.
“The legend lives on from the Chippewa on down
Of the big lake they called ‘gitche gumee'”
Lake Superior from just east of Marquette, Michigan.
The lake, it is said, never gives up her dead When the skies of November turn gloomy" Well, skies of September, anyway.
“The lake, it is said, never gives up her dead
When the skies of November turn gloomy”
Well, skies of September, anyway.  The lyrics are from Gordon Lightfoot’s song, The Wreck of the Edmund Fitzgerald, about a famous shipwreck on Lake Superior in 1975.

Anyway. I drove about halfway across Michigan’s Upper Peninsula in the absolutely pouring rain yesterday. I actually had to pull over once because the windshield wipers couldn’t keep up with it and I couldn’t see where I was going. Fortunately, the really hard rain didn’t last long, but it did rain all day long.

I spent the night just outside of Marquette, Michigan, in the little, rather oddly-named town of Ishpeming. I’ve been through this part of Michigan before, which was why I had originally had my heart set on driving up and around through western Ontario in spite of the drive being longer, but oh, well. I ate a pasty for dinner. I had vividly good memories of one I’d eaten in Marquette the last time I was here, but this one wasn’t as good, alas. A pasty is a meat pocket (hand-held) pie, filled with beef and potatoes, and, I think, turnips, and they can be delicious. This one wasn’t bad, just not as good as I remembered.

I actually overslept this morning, which was wonderful since I hadn’t really slept all that well for a few nights, and I am feeling better, although I still don’t have my voice back (why, oh, why do I always get laryngitis when I catch a cold???). Which is great fun when you have to communicate, especially with strangers. “Why are you whispering? What did you say?”  Laryngitis isn’t painful, at least not for me, but it’s really annoying.

Yup, it's going on towards fall, and here are the asters to prove it. There are some leaves around and about to prove it, too, but I didn't get any good photos of them.
Yup, it’s going on towards fall, and here are the asters to prove it. There are some leaves around and about to prove it, too, but I didn’t get any good photos of them.
This fellow was in front of the casino on the Bad River Indian Reservation, and what I'd really like to know is what kind of shenanigans that river pulled to get a name like that.
This fellow was in front of the casino on the Bad River Indian Reservation, and what I’d really like to know is what kind of shenanigans that river pulled to get a name like that.
I have a lot of cloud formation photos this week, just because there's not been a whole lot else to take photos of, but this one in particular was kind of cool.
I have a lot of cloud formation photos this week, just because there’s not been a whole lot else to take photos of, but this one in particular was kind of cool.

Anyway, I drove the rest of the way across Michigan’s Upper Peninsula, and all the way across the top of Wisconsin to Duluth, which is just across the river in Minnesota. Not really as far as it sounds, maybe 150 miles? I got here in time to watch my Seattle Seahawks (actual Jeopardy question from a few years ago: What’s the only NFL team whose name starts with the same three letters as their city?) win their season opener against the Miami Dolphins at the last moment by the skin of their teeth (final score: 12-10).

I still don’t know exactly what I’m going to do tomorrow, or for the rest of the trip, for that matter. I guess I’ll see how I feel in the morning, but I suspect I’m back in the States for good. We’ll see.