Tag Archives: Virginia

July 13: I made it to the other ocean!

But first I crossed a bridge. Although calling this thing a bridge is like calling what Crocodile Dundee had a knife [wry g]. Twenty-three miles long, with two, count ‘em two tunnels. The Chesapeake Bay Bridge-Tunnel is an amazing feat of engineering, IMHO. It was so cool.

That ship's going to hit the bridge!  Well, no.  See that building way up there?  That's a restaurant.  On the bridge, at the southern entrance of the first tunnel.  Bizarre.
That ship’s going to hit the bridge! Well, no. See that building way up there? That’s a restaurant. On the bridge, at the southern entrance of the first tunnel. Bizarre.
Taken from the restaurant parking lot with *lots* of zoom.  Pretty cool, huh?
Taken from the restaurant parking lot with *lots* of zoom. Pretty cool, huh?
More bridge.  The water was so calm, but I couldn't help but think that it's a good thing they get lots of warning about hurricanes to get people off that thing before it hits.
More bridge. The water was so calm, but I couldn’t help but think that it’s a good thing they get lots of warning about hurricanes to get people off that thing before it hits.
This is an extremely disconcerting picture.  That's the second tunnel in that gap.
This is an extremely disconcerting picture. That’s the second tunnel in that gap.
The entrance to the second tunnel.
The entrance to the second tunnel.
And the exit.  The tunnel is two lanes, but the bridge (actually a pair of bridges) is four lanes.
And the exit. The tunnel is two lanes, but the bridge (actually a pair of bridges) is four lanes.
Looking back at the northern end of the bridge from a viewpoint on the Eastern Shore.
Looking back at the northern end of the bridge from a viewpoint on the Eastern Shore.

I liked Virginia’s Eastern Shore, too, although it was more bucolic than photogenic. I did make a “that looks interesting” stop at a place called Almshouse Farm, just off U.S. 13, which runs up the backbone of the Eastern Shore. Turns out it was a museum in an old poorhouse, first built in 1804 (although the existing building is newer than that). Part of the exhibits were about the almshouse, but most of them were about the people who lived along the shore of the bay and the islands. It was definitely worth a stop.

The Almshouse Farm museum.
The Almshouse Farm museum.
The Almshouse Farm Museum had some really wonderful bird carvings.
The Almshouse Farm Museum had some really wonderful bird carvings.

The main reason I’d wanted to come to the Eastern Shore (besides an excuse to drive the bridge-tunnel) was Chincoteague Island. Like every kid of my generation, I’d read the books about Misty of Chincoteague, and I’ve always sorta wanted to see it ever since. Plus it looked like a good place to find a beach. And it has a lighthouse.

I didn’t see any ponies, alas, but I did get to walk on the beach (with a few hundred of my new best friends – there were a lot of people out sunbathing and swimming, but I’ve never been a big fan of swimming in the ocean), and to visit the lighthouse. Assateague Lighthouse was built just before the Civil War, and it’s taller than Gray’s Harbor Lighthouse, which is the tallest one in Washington. Anyway, it was about 100 degrees inside (it was in the 80sF outside and incredibly humid) and there were a lot of stairs and I didn’t make it all the way to the top. I was getting dizzy from the circular staircase, and my bifocals didn’t like it at all, but I think I’d have persisted if it weren’t for the stifling heat. I did get a picture from one of the windows that was at the highest level I reached.

The only photo I have of the ocean at Assateague National Seashore that isn't full of people [g].
The only photo I have of the ocean at Assateague National Seashore that isn’t full of people [g].
Assateague Lighthouse.
Assateague Lighthouse.
A view from near the top of Assateague Lighthouse, taken through a 150-year-old window.
A view from near the top of Assateague Lighthouse, taken through a 150-year-old window.
If this was on the west coast, I'd say it was salal, but apparently salal doesn't grow on the east coast.  The lady at the visitor center didn't know what it was, either, and I can't find anything online.  Anyone know?
If this was on the west coast, I’d say it was salal, but apparently salal doesn’t grow on the east coast. The lady at the visitor center didn’t know what it was, either, and I can’t find anything online. Anyone know?

On the way back from Chincoteague Island (which is divided into three parts – a Seaside-like tourist town (Seaside’s on the Oregon coast), Chincoteague National Wildlife Refuge, and Assateague National Seashore), I drove over a causeway to get back to the mainland, and watched the really ominous clouds come closer and closer.

Some seriously ominous clouds on the causeway leaving Chincoteague Island.
Some seriously ominous clouds on the causeway leaving Chincoteague Island.

It rained on me once I got back on the highway, but fortunately the thunderstorm didn’t start until after I found a motel here in Salisbury, Maryland. Which was a real trick because they’re having some sort of national sporting event here in town this week. If it hadn’t been for the nice couple at the tourist center, I’m not sure what I’d have done. It’s still booming and crashing and flashing out there. Fortunately, so far there’s been at least seven alligators between flash and boom.

Tomorrow I’m going to duck up into Delaware briefly (so that I can knock it off of my states-I-haven’t-been-to-yet list), then back over to Chesapeake Bay, where I will make my way up to the Bay Bridge and across to Annapolis and Baltimore, where I will be spending a few days with my friend Katrina and her sister Teri, then picking my best friend Loralee up at the Baltimore airport. She and I are going to explore DC together for a few days before I head north again.

So if my blogging is a bit thin on the ground for the next week or so, that’s why. I will catch it all up once I’m on my own again – or I may have time to blog after all. Who knows?

July 12: Big bangs and winding roads and something called a bridge-tunnel

Today I finally dragged myself away from Williamsburg. But, as I promised myself four days ago when I got here, I went to visit Yorktown before I headed out.

Yorktown, like Williamsburg and Jamestown, has a living history program. This one’s called Yorktown Victory Center, and it shows how the soldiers lived during the Revolution, as well as how the settlers of the time lived. I got to see a musket being fired (loud!), and helped demonstrate how a cannon is fired (don’t ask [g]), then backed way away while it was being fired (LOUD! – I couldn’t take a photo because I had to have my hands over my ears). I listened to an army surgeon talk about stuff that’ll probably give me nightmares tonight, and talked with a fellow about some chickens.

The flags of the 13 first states at half staff (I'm assuming because of Dallas) in front of the Yorktown Victory Center.
The flags of the 13 first states at half staff (I’m assuming because of Dallas) in front of the Yorktown Victory Center.
A pierced tin lantern, which I thought was a cool detail.
A pierced tin lantern, which I thought was a cool detail.
One of my better shots (no pun intended). It's hard to take a photo when something that loud goes off.
One of my better shots (no pun intended). It’s hard to take a photo when something that loud goes off.

The cannon I helped demonstrate with (I got to ram the cannonball down the cannon [g]).
The cannon I helped demonstrate with (I got to ram the cannonball down the cannon [g]).
The Army surgeon talking about Really Gross Stuff [tm]. He also taught a little girl how to fish a musket ball out of an imaginary wound.
The Army surgeon talking about Really Gross Stuff [tm]. He also taught a little girl how to fish a musket ball out of an imaginary wound.

I used to have one of these when I was a kid, except my pegs were little copper pegs, not nails.
I used to have one of these when I was a kid, except my pegs were little copper pegs, not nails.
Signing a little girl up as a volunteer. He and I had an interesting discussion about the problems of being a lefty back then, from quill pens to muskets having to be fired righthanded.
Signing a little girl up as a volunteer. He and I had an interesting discussion about the problems of being a lefty back then, from quill pens to muskets having to be fired righthanded.
This rooster's breed is called Dorking. Dorking chickens were brought over with the Jamestown settlers.
This rooster’s breed is called Dorking. Dorking chickens were brought over with the Jamestown settlers.

All in all, it was an interesting morning. The only disappointing part was that they’re building new exhibits, but they won’t be open until the fall.

When I walked out of the museum, a trolley (a dolled-up bus, basically) sat at the curb. I asked where it was going, and was told that it goes into the town of Yorktown, so I got on. Yorktown itself is a pretty little waterfront tourist town and it turned out to be a great place to get lunch, too.

The very flowery village of Yorktown.
The very flowery village of Yorktown.
Yorktown's waterfront.
Yorktown’s waterfront.

I decided to walk the half-mile back to the museum parking lot, along a waterfront trail that would have been fine except for all the kudzu. It’s bad enough driving past it, but walking? Yikes.

In the afternoon I took the drive around the Yorktown Battlefield. I knew the French came and fought with the American troops, but I had no idea how many of them there were. They really made the difference, and I need to read more – I know way more about the Civil War than I need to, but not enough about the Revolution.

The Moore house, where Washington and Cornwallis sent their seconds in command to sign the British surrender papers.
The Moore house, where Washington and Cornwallis sent their seconds in command to sign the British surrender papers.
I thought this was interesting.
I thought this was interesting.
And here's the ravine the sign was talking about. Amazing.
And here’s the ravine the sign was talking about. Amazing.
The sign that went with this talked about how most streams back then were forded, not bridged.
The sign that went with this talked about how most streams back then were forded, not bridged.

By the time I was done, and had gone back to the visitor center to peruse their bookstore briefly, it was three, but I decided to go on for a ways. It might not have been my best choice – I got stuck in some rush hour traffic in Norfolk – but it was all right.

Anyway, I’m in Virginia Beach, about two miles south of the Chesapeake Bay Bridge-Tunnel. I’ve already been over/through the Hampton Roads Bridge-Tunnel, which was really weird. You cross a flat bridge that looks sort of like the Lake Washington floating bridges, then all of a sudden the road ducks down and you’re under the ground that’s under the water. You drive through a tunnel for what seems like a long time, then pop back up and all of a sudden you’re driving across the water again. It’s surreal. And the Chesapeake Bridge/Tunnel tomorrow is going to be like the Hampton Roads one on steroids.

July 10: Jamestown: things have changed in 25 years

A view along the Colonial Parkway between Williamsburg and Jamestown.
A view along the Colonial Parkway between Williamsburg and Jamestown.

Today was sorta surreal. Jamestown is one of the places I have the strongest memories of from being here in 1991 with my ex. I remember wandering around, looking at the foundations of the buildings of the town, some statuary, and that was about all that was there.

Things changed in Jamestown when an archaeology professor came to visit in the early 90s and asked where the fort was. When he was told that the fort site had been lost to erosion and was out in the river, he said, I bet I can prove you were wrong. They gave him permission to dig and told him he had ten years. He found the foundation of the fort in less than one, and they’ve been excavating it ever since.

The result is that there’s so much more to Jamestown than there was when I was here last time, and the scale of things (they’ve literally found thousands of artifacts) and the knowledge they’ve gained is just amazing. I took a tour led by a young woman who works for Preservation Virginia (the non-profit that is in charge of the excavations, which are adjacent to the NPS land, but not on it), who told the story, and about the excavations, and what they’ve found and how they found it, and was spellbinding in spite of the heat, and in spite of the fact that the supposed 45-minute tour ended up lasting almost an hour and a half. I would not have missed this for the world.

The obelisk I saw from the ferry the other day.  Turns out it was constructed to commemorate the 350th anniversary of the settling of Jamestown in 1607.
The obelisk I saw from the ferry the other day. Turns out it was constructed to commemorate the 350th anniversary of the settling of Jamestown in 1607.
One of the excavations.  This was a cellar with a well in it, and apparently what the settlers did when the wells went bad (which happened regularly that close to the brackish river) was use them as garbage dumps, aka archaeological treasure troves.
One of the excavations. This was a cellar with a well in it, and apparently what the settlers did when the wells went bad (which happened regularly that close to the brackish river) was use them as garbage dumps, aka archaeological treasure troves.
Part of the remains of Jamestown's first church, with four graves at the front, the people inside of which they've been able to identify.
Part of the remains of Jamestown’s first church, with four graves at the front, the people inside of which they’ve been able to identify.

Then, after a very pleasant lunch in the café on site, I went to the museum, where I saw some of the artifacts she told us about. It made it all so real.

This is Jane (they don't know who she actually was, so they just gave her the name).  Her skull proved definitively that yes, the Jamestown settlers did practice cannibalism during the "starving times" during the first winter.  That's her skull on the left, and a conception of what she might have looked like on the right.  Apparently this discovery was *huge* in archaeological circles when she was found a few years ago.
This is Jane (they don’t know who she actually was, so they just gave her the name). Her skull proved definitively that yes, the Jamestown settlers did practice cannibalism during the “starving times” during the first winter. That’s her skull on the left, and a conception of what she might have looked like on the right. Apparently this discovery was *huge* in archaeological circles when she was found a few years ago.
This tiny (three inches maybe?) silver box is a Catholic reliquary, found in one of the graves in that church above.  Which was Anglican.  The story that went with that is too long to detail here, but it was really fascinating.
This tiny (three inches maybe?) silver box is a Catholic reliquary, found in one of the graves in that church above. Which was Anglican. The story that went with that is too long to detail here, but it was really fascinating.

I think even Emerson would have approved.

Deer in the swamp between Jamestown and the visitor center.
Deer in the swamp between Jamestown and the visitor center.
Another view of the swamp and the deer.  There's a very nice jugwalk causeway over it, thank goodness.  Oh, and I've never seen so many dragonflies in one place before.  Too bad none of them would hold still long enough for a photo.
Another view of the swamp and the deer. There’s a very nice jugwalk causeway over it, thank goodness. Oh, and I’ve never seen so many dragonflies in one place before. Too bad none of them would hold still long enough for a photo.
Wooden causeway along the Jamestown Island Road, which was a pretty drive with lots of historical signs.
Wooden causeway along the Jamestown Island Road, which was a pretty drive with lots of historical signs.

There was another museum in the NPS visitor center, but my brain was on overload by then, so I decided to take the little drive around the island, which let it rest a bit (and let me sit in the AC), then I decided to come on back to the motel, since it was getting late in the afternoon already.

Tomorrow I’m going back out to see the museum I missed, then go to the living history museum across the road, and I think I’m going to end up spending a fourth night here, and head for the eastern shore on Tuesday after a morning at Yorktown. I don’t have to be in Baltimore till Thursday, so there’s plenty of time. It’s just that there’s so much to do here!

July 9: Footsore, sweaty, and in my element

Wow, was it hot today. I don’t think I’ve ever spent that much time in that much heat and humidity (90s, with 60-something percent humidity – they were saying the heat index was over 100dF, which is just Wrong, in the most Ivanian sense of the term). But it was so worth it, and all of the buildings were air-conditioned, at any rate. Their original owners would have been so jealous…

I spent the entire day wandering around Colonial Williamsburg. It’s pricey – one day is $41, getting the ticket holder into all of the historical buildings and all of the craftsman demonstrations, plus two art museums I didn’t make it to – but it was fascinating. I went through the Capitol, and the Governor’s Palace, and several residences, and a tavern, which is not a bar, but more like a B&B or a rooming house.

The capitol building, with a couple of the many re-enactors sitting out front.
The capitol building, with a couple of the many re-enactors sitting out front.
The equivalent of the Supreme Court's room.
The equivalent of the Supreme Court’s room.
A handsome young Colonial gentleman.
A handsome young Colonial gentleman.
The Governor's Palace.
The Governor’s Palace.
A mirror protected from flyspots in the Wythe (pronounced with) house.
A mirror protected from flyspots in the Wythe (pronounced with) house.
George Washington slept here.  In the Wythe House.
George Washington slept here. In the Wythe House.
Stove in the ballroom in the Governor's Palace.
Stove in the ballroom in the Governor’s Palace.

I saw bricks and furniture and barrels and clothing and fabric being made (oh, and fabric being dyed, using natural materials, of course – the red was cochineal and the blue was indigo and the yellow was some kind of bark, and the colors were amazing). Shoemakers and hat makers and wig makers and candle makers and metal workers and just all sorts of crafts. Everything your 18th century colonist needs, well, except that most of the raw materials had to come to them through England, which had a monopoly on shipping, which caused a great deal of trouble. Even local stuff, like the indigo from South Carolina, had to go to England, be processed, and come back to Williamsburg.

Practicing Mr. Gutenberg's profession.
Practicing Mr. Gutenberg’s profession.
Making candles by melting wax over an open fire (in this weather) and dipping the wicks.  It takes about forty dips to make a candle.
Making candles by melting wax over an open fire (in this weather) and dipping the wicks. It takes about forty dips to make a candle.
Another open fire in this weather, this one in the dyeing demonstration.
Another open fire in this weather, this one in the dyeing demonstration.

I ate lunch in the Merchants’ Square just outside of the historical area, because it was considerably cheaper. Still good food, though, just without the ambiance [g].

And I drank more water today than I have ever in one day, I think.

By the time I got back to my motel this evening, I was footsore, and I think I walked more in one day today than I have since I left home.

It was so worth it. Especially the gardens, which were amazing. My photos do not do them justice in any way, shape, or form. Even the little kitchen gardens were gorgeous, full of plants that I haven’t seen blooming in years, because the climate’s so different from home, and I haven’t been to a hot, humid climate in the summertime in I don’t know how long. The crowning glory was the garden at the Governor’s Palace. Boxwood hedges and long, long flowering borders just full of gorgeous blooms.

A simple kitchen garden.  The pink flowers are phlox (which I did actually grow at home [g]).
A simple kitchen garden. The pink flowers are phlox (which I did actually grow at home [g]).
Sunflowers, a house with a nifty chimney, and a garbage can disguised as a barrel.
Sunflowers, a house with a nifty chimney, and a garbage can disguised as a barrel.
Boxwood in a back garden.  Boxwood has a distressing tendency to smell like cat pee, but it is pretty.
Boxwood in a back garden. Boxwood has a distressing tendency to smell like cat pee, but it is pretty.
Part of the Governor's  Palace's gorgeous gardens.
Part of the Governor’s Palace’s gorgeous gardens.

 

I love Williamsburg. I suspect if I lived within a day’s drive, I’d buy an annual pass the way I do now for the national parks pass. And I’d get more than my money’s worth.

July 8: Headed back in time for a few days

I’ve been on the road for six weeks as of today.  That is so hard to believe.  It’s going fast.

I was only about fifty miles from Williamsburg when I woke up this morning. I did, however, get a late start, and then I made a wrong turn that added about ten miles to the trip, but it was a pretty drive, so I wasn’t complaining. Also, I got to ride a ferry! A free car ferry across the James River, which at this tidal point is more of a bay than anything else. Also, I drove right onto the ferry, and it left right away. No waiting in the heat at all.

The writing on the back window of this van says, "Gettysburg or Bust, Boy Scout Troop 92" somewhere, "North Carolina. There was a whole convoy of them, at least eight vehicles. I thought it was funny.
The writing on the back window of this van says, “Gettysburg or Bust, Boy Scout Troop 92” somewhere, “North Carolina.” There was a whole convoy of them, at least eight vehicles. I thought it was funny.
The James River ferry, the Pocahontas.
The James River ferry, the Pocahontas.
Looking back along the walkway to the south shore of the James River.
Looking back along the walkway to the south shore of the James River.

The ferry ride was fun. I could see the Jamestown NHS from the water, and some tall ships that are part of a living history museum next door (that I’m going to tour while I’m here). It was also about ten degrees cooler on the water, with the breeze (mind, that was ten degrees cooler than ninety-something with air thick enough to drink, but still).

Part of Jamestown NHS. I don't know what the column is, but I'll be sure to find out.
Part of Jamestown NHS. I don’t know what the column is, but I’ll be sure to find out.
Tall ships on the James River, part of the Jamestown living history museum (which is not part of Jamestown NHS).
Tall ships on the James River, part of the Jamestown living history museum (which is not part of Jamestown NHS).

After I got here, I found my motel so I wouldn’t have to worry about it (I’d made reservations last night – I was a bit concerned about arriving in such a tourist destination on a Friday night in the summertime), then I got seriously lost trying to find the Colonial Parkway to Yorktown NHS. I didn’t get there till about four, and most of the site closes at 4:30, but I did get to go through the visitor center. Yorktown will be on my way out of town when I head towards the Chesapeake Bay Bridge/Tunnel in a couple of days (I may spend three nights here, I may stay four – there’s a lot to do and see here, especially for a history buff who eats up living history with a spoon like I do), so I’ll make sure to leave early enough to take the auto tour of the battlefield and see the rest of it then.

A view of the Colonial Parkway, which runs from Jamestown through Williamsburg to Yorktown.
A view of the Colonial Parkway, which runs from Jamestown through Williamsburg to Yorktown.
One of dozens of similar signs along the Colonial Parkway. I chose this one because the content surprised me.
One of dozens of similar signs along the Colonial Parkway. I chose this one because the content surprised me.
A cannon associated with the Marquis de Lafayette, inside the Yorktown visitor center.
A cannon associated with the Marquis de Lafayette, inside the Yorktown visitor center.
A mockup of one of Cornwallis's ships, inside the visitor center. They had the inside mocked up, too.
A mockup of one of Cornwallis’s ships, inside the visitor center. They had the inside mocked up, too.

Tomorrow I am going to visit Colonial Williamsburg. Finally. I’m sorta doing things backwards, from a historical point of view. Yorktown is the newest site (it’s where Cornwallis surrendered to Washington at the end of the Revolution), Colonial Williamsburg is from an older time period, and Jamestown, of course, is the earliest settlement in Virginia (I’m thinking in what became the U.S., but I think St. Augustine, Florida, or Santa Fe, New Mexico, might be older). But that’s okay.

Anyway, tomorrow expect lots of photos of people doing antique trades and stuff, and fancy old buildings and their insides, and pretty gardens (the last time I was here was in April, 1999, and the place was full of tulips – I’m looking forward to seeing what the gardens look like in midsummer).

Oh, and I had an idea for another book today.  I’m kind of afraid it’s a mouthful that’s way more than I can chew, but then that’s what I thought about what later became Repeating History, too, seventeen years ago, so maybe not.  I hope.

July 4-7: Boom, crash, and friends

Three days later…

What Mary calls "the green wall," on my way across from Charlotte to Fayetteville.
What Mary calls “the green wall,” on my way across from Charlotte to Fayetteville.
Another crape myrtle, this one across the street from a chicken fast food place called Bojangles, where I ate lunch on the way to Morgan's.
Another crape myrtle, this one across the street from a chicken fast food place called Bojangles, where I ate lunch on the way to Morgan’s.

Independence Day was fun. I made it to Fayetteville by mid-afternoon, and after a bit of confusion arrived at Morgan and Kaz’s house. It’s a cute little house, full of three very large dogs (mostly malamute-husky mix, and one has a bit of lab in him, too). Morgan had just been given a sewing machine as a gift, sans manual, and when she pulled it out of its box, it was a vintage Singer just like mine only I think a few years older. So we went to JoAnn’s, which was open on the holiday, bought some thread and a remnant to practice on, and got absolutely drenched running back to the car in a downpour.

But at least she now knows how to thread her sewing machine, wind the bobbin, and sew with it. My good deed for the day [g].

Then the thunder and the lightning started, and we added fireworks of our own (well, they did), fountains and sparklers and all that fun stuff. The neighbors pitched in with their own supply, too. It was fun.

The day before yesterday I headed north towards my friend Mary’s home, up near the Virginia border about 150 miles away. Finding her house was a bit of an adventure, too, but I did it, even if I had to pass way too much kudzu to do it.

Mary lives with some friends, in a sort of mother-in-law apartment, way out in the country. It was good to see her because the last time I saw her was in 2011 when we went to the Reno WorldCon together. We pretty much chatted non-stop the whole time I was there, but the best part (aside from meeting her slighly psycho cat Miles – I told her she was tempting fate to name him after Miles Vorkosigan!) was yesterday when we took a drive to some local landmarks.

First we went to Pilot Knob, which you can see really well from a viewpoint on the highway, and which you can also drive up, almost to the top. The views are pretty spectacular, with the haze from the humidity blurring the horizon again.

Pilot KNob, North Carolina.
Pilot Knob, North Carolina, with daylilies in the foreground.
A zoomed Pilot Knob.
A zoomed Pilot Knob.
A view from the lookout on top (well not on the knob but just below it) of Pilot Knob.
A view from the lookout on top (well not on the knob but just below it) of Pilot Knob.
A very blurry horizon from Pilot Knob.
A very blurry horizon from Pilot Knob.

Then we drove around to Hanging Rock, but just about the time we got there the skies opened up again, so I never actually got to see the hanging rock itself. But we did go to a nice place for lunch. And then she showed me – or tried to show me – the house she used to live in with her husband before he died. But the driveway (which was basically more pothole than road, and really, really steep and slick because of the rain) was gated shut halfway up. I was so glad there was somewhere to turn around!

We also looked at a few of my photos [g].

This morning I headed out again, across the border into Virginia.  I made a couple of stops, one at a state park where I caught my journal up and ate a picnic lunch, and again at the site of an old fort.

Occoneechee State Park along a reservoir in Virginia, where I ate a picnic lunch.
Occoneechee State Park along a reservoir in Virginia, where I ate a picnic lunch.
This is exactly what almost all of U.S. 58 across southern Virginia looked like. It was like a very mild roller coaster.
This is exactly what almost all of U.S. 58 across southern Virginia looked like. It was like a very mild roller coaster.
Fort Christanna, Virginia, state historical site, which dates from before the American Revolution.
Fort Christanna, Virginia, state historical site, which dates from before the American Revolution.
Black-eyed susans along the gravel road to Fort Christanna.
Black-eyed susans along the gravel road to Fort Christanna.

I’m aiming towards the Atlantic coast. I’m actually headed towards Williamsburg, where I haven’t been since 1991. I can’t wait.