Tag Archives: Westport

to the coast

I was sick Sunday and yesterday, alas, but on Saturday my friend Judy drove me to Westport, where we ate fish and chips and we went to the Maritime museum where I got to see their magnificent first order Fresnel lens before I went back to her van and took a nap, while she toured the rest of the museum (I’d been there several times before and I was pretty tired after the 2-hour drive), then went out to the promenade where I actually walked all the way to the first bench, which has a wonderful view of the ocean.

Then I slept most of the way back, but that’s okay.

Here’s the usual photographic proof!  I have a video I want to post as part of this as soon as I figure out how to crop video, too.

A first order (the largest size) Fresnel lens, which is the most beautiful utilitarian object in the world. I have video of it rotating, throwing off rainbows, that I will post as soon as I can.
A woolly bear caterpillar on the sidewalk.
This little dude was singing his heart out along the promenade.
A view from the boardwalk.
A view from the first bench on the promenade (coming from the Gray’s Harbor lighthouse end of the path).

And the next morning, Judy and I started the process that will end with her taking over the distribution of my books and the upkeep of my website when I’m gone.  So my legacy will live on without me.  This makes me so happy.

 

Christmas at the beach

I have a rather odd Christmas tradition.  Almost all of the folks I’m
related to live far away, and I’m not big on going to other people’s
houses for Christmas, anyway (I always felt rather like a sort of
superannuated college student when I did), so what I’ve been doing ever since I moved to western Washington, on the Christmases I haven’t gone elsewhere and when the weather cooperates (which it has been this year, far more than it should be), is to drive to Westport, on the coast, and walk their wonderful three-mile dune-top
promenade.  I always take a special picnic, since nothing’s open on
Christmas Day, and I always have a wonderful time.

Anyway, I just got back, and here are some photos I took:

The dune-top promenade at Westport.
The dune-top promenade at Westport.
Birds on a pond behind the dunes.  Mostly gulls, I'm sure.
Birds on a pond behind the dunes. Mostly gulls, I’m sure.
A view of the dunes, ocean, and the resort town of Ocean Shores, across Grays Harbor from Westport.
A view of the dunes, ocean, and the resort town of Ocean Shores, across Grays Harbor from Westport.
From the viewing tower at the marina in Westport, at the very end of the peninsula.
From the viewing tower at the marina in Westport, at the very end of the peninsula.

After I left Westport, I drove south towards Willapa Bay, where I turned  east and drove along its northern shore.

At the very mouth of Willapa Bay.
At the very mouth of Willapa Bay.

Raymond is a small town at the head of Willapa Bay.  Otherwise
pretty much like any other logging/fishing town in the Pacific Northwest, it has distinguished itself in a very special way.  Local artists (according to the sign, which doesn’t name names) created many beautiful and whimsical mostly two-dimensional metal
sculptures twenty years ago, and installed them all over town.

Welcome to Raymond, Washington
Welcome to Raymond, Washington
All kinds of critters along the main drag in town.
All kinds of critters along the main drag in town.
A lady in town.
A lady in town.
Birds in a wetland (a real wetland, if not real birds).
Birds in a wetland (a real wetland, if not real birds).
Two children and a dog.
Two children and a dog.

Another interesting thing about these sculptures is that they’re
mostly people in the center of town, and as you go out into the
countryside they change over to animals.

Anyway, I think they’re nifty.

After I left Raymond, I drove east on state route 6, which is a lovely, winding country road, fifty miles to Chehalis and I-5, and north on home.

It was a lovely day, and a Merry Christmas.  Everyone I met on the dunes promenade, and there were a number of us, had holiday
greetings for each other, which was the icing on the cake.

I hope everyone has had a good holiday, and I hope we all have a good 2014!

(some rain would be nice — we have had a very dry winter so far)

the ocean at Christmas

First, to anyone who celebrates a winter holiday, happy holidays to you!

Second, the days are getting longer!  Not noticeable at first, but it will be soon.  Nowhere to go but up, now.

Third, here in the Pacific Northwest, it really doesn’t rain all winter, although you couldn’t prove it by looking out my windows right now.  At least it isn’t snowing, which was a distinct possibility according to the forecast.  Which is why I made my traditional coastal pilgrimage on Christmas Eve this year instead of Christmas Day.  Yesterday was a pretty day, or at least the afternoon was.

I hauled off and forgot my camera, though, so you’ll have to take my word for it.  You will not, however, have to take my word for how gorgeous it was year before last, when I took many, many pictures, including some of views I’ve not been able to catch before or since, especially not this time of year.

 

Taken on the beach at Westport
Taken on the beach at Westport
The ocean view from the promenade path.
The ocean view from the promenade path.
A view from the promenade path.
Another view from the promenade path.
Detail from one of the memorial plaques along the promenade.
Detail from one of the memorial plaques along the promenade.
The Westport jetty and Ocean Shores across the mouth of Grays Harbor
The Westport jetty and the town of Ocean Shores across the mouth of Grays Harbor
The Westport jetty with waves, from the promenade path.
The Westport jetty with waves, from the promenade path.
The Olympic Mountains from the promenade path.
The Olympic Mountains from the promenade path.
View from the paved path on the dunes south toward the ocean.
View from the paved promenade path on the dunes south toward the ocean.
Tsunami evacuation sign.
Tsunami evacuation sign.  These are all over the place, but out on that peninsula, there’s really nowhere to go in a hurry.