Welcome to my exhibit!

Well, actually, to the Lakewood Historical Society’s new exhibit, which I researched, designed, created, and installed (in my other life as a freelance museum curator), about Lakewood’s long and deep connection with the military, from Fort Steilacoom in the mid-1800s, through Camp, later Fort, Lewis and McChord Air Force base, and on to what is now called Joint Base Lewis-McChord.  Anyway, here are some photos of the exhibit, which I finished installing today, and which opens on Saturday. Do forgive the photography.  Using a flash in the museum is not a good idea, and I obviously need to buy a tripod.

The introductory panel.
The introductory panel, with two photos of the main gate at Fort Lewis, one not long after it was built during WWI, and the other as it is now.
The first exhibit case, including a Civil War era forage cap from Fort Steilacoom, and a WWI era bugle from Camp Lewis.
The first exhibit case, including a Civil War era forage cap from Fort Steilacoom on the right, and a WWI era hat and bugle from Camp Lewis.
The panel about Fort Steilacoom and the early maneuvers in the Lakewood area.
The panel about Fort Steilacoom and the early maneuvers in the Lakewood area.
A timeline panel, a couple of photo panels, and the panel about Camp Lewis.
A timeline panel, a few photo panels, and the panel about Camp Lewis.
Another timeline and more photos.  The panel in the upper lefthand corner is a reproduction of WWII-era "smileage coupons" purchased by civilians, given to soldiers, who could redeem them for movie tickets, food, and other non-necessities.
Another timeline and more photos. The panel in the upper lefthand corner is a reproduction of WWII-era “smileage coupons” purchased by civilians, given to soldiers, who could redeem them for movie tickets, food, and other non-necessities.
The other exhibit case, full of commemorative regimental coins and a plaque with a replica Stryker vehicle from Lakewood's community connector program.
The other exhibit case, full of commemorative regimental coins and a plaque with a replica Stryker vehicle from Lakewood’s community connector program. Oh, and three sets of dog tags. One from WWI, one from WWII, and one from Vietnam, all from local soldiers.
And more photo panels as well as the panel telling about JBLM and the community connector program.
And more photo panels as well as the panel telling about JBLM and the community connector program, which connects local communities with specific military units as a mutual support program.

If you are in the vicinity (here is the link to the Lakewood Historical Society’s website) between noon and two o’clock on Saturday afternoon, May 3rd, for the grand opening, we’d love to see you there.  And if you can’t make it then, the exhibit will be open to the public until next spring — the museum’s hours are noon to four, Wednesday through Saturday.